Community Report - Criminalization of HIV Non-Disclosure: Impacts on Indigenous People in Regina

Posted on May 2 by Lana Holinaty

Community Report - Criminalization of HIV Non-Disclosure: Impacts on Indigenous People in Regina

This report includes a summary of the key findings from research that was done in July 2017. Interviews were done with Indigenous people in Regina who are HIV positive, and with people working in the community. Thank you to all of the participants for sharing your knowledge.


The goal of the research was to learn about how Indigenous people who are HIV positive, and those who support this community in Regina, are being impacted by Canadian criminal laws around HIV non-disclosure. Indigenous people who are HIV positive are being negatively impacted in distinct ways by the law. Indigenous people’s experiences are different from non-Indigenous people’s experiences, yet the research on HIV and the law tends not to take this into account.

This research is based on 26 interviews. The interviews were done by Krista Shore. This project was a collaboration between Margaret Poitras, CEO of All Nations Hope Network (ANHN) and Dr. Emily Snyder, who is an Assistant Professor in Indigenous Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Saskatchewan. This booklet was prepared by Dr. Snyder. A detailed law and policy report of the findings is also available through ANHN’s website.

Click here for a full copy of the report

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